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20121201
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. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this
york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight our focus is on what can be done so that the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school does not happen again. on friday december 14th a gunman killed 26 people, 20 of them were children between the ages of 6 and 7. it is the second deadliest mass shooting in american history. the killings have revived the debate on gun control and demonstrated the need to rethink our approach to mental illness. president obama traveled to the bereaved town to attend a community vigil and console families. here is a part of the president's address to the grieving people of that town, and to the nation. >> no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil or prevent every senseless act of violence in our society but that can't an excuse for inaction. surely we did:do better than this. if there's even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town, from the grief that's visited tucson, aurora, and oak creek and newtown, and communities from columbine to blacksberg before that, then surely we have an obligation to try. >> rose: jo
news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now trying to figure out what is the right size of the industry. >> reporter: still, economists say citi's action today is not the start of a new wave of mass layoffs across corporate america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000 new private sector jobs w
jobs are in consumer banking. the move comes less than two months since a shakeup at citi ousting former c.e.o., vikram pandit. he was succeeded by michael corbat. the bank nearly collapsed during the crisis and ultimately received bailouts totaling $45 billion, money that citi has since repaid. roben farzhad has long watched the changes at citi for bloomberg "businessweek" and joins us again tonight. roben, welcome. today we heard that stocks soared on the news of these layoffs. what does that tell us about what was going on at citi? >> it's sad, actually. citigroup is know-- you could say the financial crisis is over but in the throes of an existential crisis. it doesn't know what it wants to be. investors have been clamoring for a while for citigroup to simplify, to shed payrolls, to be good at something. it does everything, but it isn't market leading, necessarily, in any one category. and by and large, they got the layoffs, at least the beginning round of layoffs that they wanted today. >> ifill: we know many of these layoffs are noin the u.s., but i assume part of the relati
out of the city into the suburban areas that are held by the free syrian army. what you can see is a deterioration in the position of the regime and the strain of war as well. will that result in and trying to somehow do a deal? i do not know. but i know that a political deal is the only real choice the syrians have. if they do not get that, they face a long and bloody war. >> today, we have the american and russian foreign ministers meeting with the u.n. envoy to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. and the absence of a security council resol
city, i think we can do this. >> i do have a cynicism in me that says, you know, if we lose momentum we're going to be footnoted to the next horrible tragedy that unfolds. a month from now, two months from now. i hate that feeling. it's really cynical and a horrible thing to think. but it seems like that's sort of been the pattern over the last several years. >> i support responsible gun ownership. i've gone to firing ranges. i've fired guns. i don't own a gun. i would be happy to listen to responsible gun owners as well. i don't support banning all guns. just weapons that can just keech shooting and shooting and shooting. >> and i feel the same way. i grew up learning to shoot with my father. it's one of the few things we did together. >> the fact is we need to start enforcing laws we have. we need to make stronger laws. particularly regarding these high-powered weapons. that are brutally efficient at killing people. because there's no need for civilians to have those. i don't think we need to ban guns. i think we need to find the right balance. it may not just be the guns. it might al
-style weapons. they don't belong in the streets of our cities. or our towns >> ifill: finally, senator feinstein, we have been here before. the president, as he said last night, has spoken at four different memorial services for shooting victims since he's been president. each time there's been discussion that this is the moment especially after a congresswoman was shot, this is the moment when everything will change. why is this the moment? >> well, this is the moment because i think people have had it. they have had it in fear. you know, look at aurora. that man came in with 100-round clip, excuse me, drum. if that drum hadn't jammed he would have killed many more people. look at virginia tech. look at jones town. look at jonesboro, rather. looks at columbine. look at what's been happening. it's got to stop. our schools have to be safe places. these guns are the guns that the grievance killer, the gangs that people who want to do real damage look for and find very easy to obtain in our society. we need to change that. that's what i'm trying to do. >> ifill: senator dianne feinstein, democrat o
female health workers killed in different parts of karachi, another in a different city as they tried to vaccinate against polio. police say the -- it is clear these were coordinated attacks. the taliban are in charge of this area, says the mother of one of the victims. they say this polio-polio program was planned by america to finish off our nation. they shot my daughter in the head. in the 1990's, about 20,000 people and here in pakistan were affected by polio. that came down to just 28 in 2005. but the numbers have risen since then and there is a risk they could rise further. what changed was propaganda from the pot -- the pakistani taliban. bay said the health workers were spies from western agencies and that they would sterilize children. began the program in some areas and workers were beaten out in others. then the militants found another justification for their position. when american -- america try to use a pakistani doctor and a fixed -- fake a vaccination program to get information about the home of bin laden. >> unfortunately, and in advisedly, they employed a health a va
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. begin this evening with politic. less than a month remains for lawmaker to reach a deal before the fiscal cliff deadline. the whitehouse open sists tax rates must rise on higher incomes in order to balance spending cuts but republican leadership remains committed to extending the bush tax cuts for all a tax bracket. brainer offer his response to the president. in an interview with julianna goldman of bloomberg news obama called the boehner plan quote out of balance. >> i think that we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it's going to require what i talked about during the campaign which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure that the country grows. and unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks for example about $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> rose: and here is the president talking abo
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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